Andina

Peru: Over 3,000 people enjoy Inti Raymi ceremony in Cusco

Miles de cusqueños, turistas nacionales y extranjeros vibraron de emoción con la tradicional escenificación del Inti Raymi en la explanada del parque arqueológico de Sacsayhuamán.

Miles de cusqueños, turistas nacionales y extranjeros vibraron de emoción con la tradicional escenificación del Inti Raymi en la explanada del parque arqueológico de Sacsayhuamán.

13:12 | Cusco (Cusco region), Jun. 25.

At least 3,000 people —among locals, domestic and foreign tourists— enjoyed the spectacular staging of the Inti Raymi ceremony, a celebration to Inti (Sun God) held every 24th of June in the former Imperial City of Cusco.

The event took place at the terrace of Sacsayhuaman Archaeological Park last Saturday.

The spectacular show featured over 500 actors, who role-played a solemn tribute and offered thanks to the Sun God, patron deity of the Inca Empire.


The leading roles were played by performing arts teacher David Anca and actress Norvina Gallegos, who starred as Inca Pachacutec and the Coya (Inca's main wife), respectively.

The actors spoke in Quechua, and their messages were interpreted into Spanish by an interlocutor. 


Delegations representing each of the four suyos or regions of the Inca Empire —Antisuyo (East), Contisuyo (West), Qollasuyo (South) and Chinchaysuyo (North)— joined the acting coming from their respective directions.

This is one of the many activities happening in Cusco in observance of Imperial City's jubilee month.

Inti Raymi

The Inti Raymi is an Inca ceremony that takes place once a year in Cusco —capital of former Tawantinsuyo Empire— between the end of the harvest period and the beginning of the vernal equinox of the Andes, in the second half of June.


At the time of the Incas Inti Raymi was equivalent to a New Year celebration.

Held between May and June, the observance welcomed a new year and put the previous "crop year" in the past.

Shortly after that, the new agricultural cycle began in July, so the period from the last week of June to early July was a transition time between the dying agricultural year and the new year to come. 


Inca Pachacutec established the Festival of the Sun more than six centuries ago, and Cusco locals perform it with the same enthusiasm as their ancestors during the Inca period.

(END) PHS/TMC/JHM/MVB

Published: 6/25/2017
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