Andina

Meet Sofia, Peru's Guinness World Record holder

LIMA, PERÚ - FEBRERO 16. Sofía Pichihua, periodista de la Agencia Andina, obtiene Récord Guinness por colección de serie animada

Foto: ANDINA/Juan Carlos Guzmán Negrini

LIMA, PERÚ - FEBRERO 16. Sofía Pichihua, periodista de la Agencia Andina, obtiene Récord Guinness por colección de serie animada Foto: ANDINA/Juan Carlos Guzmán Negrini

00:00 | Lima, Feb. 18.

The greatest Cardcaptor Sakura memorabilia's collector, Peruvian Sofia Pichihua, has been awarded the Guinness World Record certificate.

Pichihua decided to apply for a record to honor the 20th anniversary of release of the first Cardcaptor Sakura manga, first broadcast in Peru in 2000. 

Earlier this week, the Andina news agency journalist received the certificate for having the largest collection of Cardcaptor Sakura memorabilia, consisting of 1,086 items.


"It is a dream come true. I earned the record in 2016, but I was informed about it a couple of weeks ago," Pichihua told Andina news agency.

"I began the collection when I was at school, but I set myself the goal of earning the record about three years ago," she said. 

The manga —which tells the story of a girl with magical powers— has been published in Japan again.

"It includes a new story and the main character, Sakura, is already attending high school and has to use her superpowers to keep the city's peaceful atmosphere," she explained. The anime is due to begin airing in Japan next year.


Collected items

Pichihua's collection includes items from Peru, Mexico, the United States and Japan. "I've got towels, purses, key-chains, action figures, mangas, DVDs, VHS cassettes, videogames, discs and other merchandising products," she indicated.

Collecting these products has been tough, since most of the items are imported. "My other dream is to head to Japan and interview the manga's authors, CLAMP," she stated.


The most difficult items to collect were those put on the Japanese market after 1996. "Some cost between US$200 to US$500." For instance, Nakayoshi magazine, which published the manga's first issue, was one of the toughest to get, as well as the first Gameboy.

This is the second Japanese culture-related record Peru has received.

(END) ECG/RMB

Published: 2/18/2017
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